6-second science

This video is a compilation of the best clips from the 'Six-second science fair' run by GE recently. (Apparently it attracted more than 600 entries!) Could be really interesting to set something like this as a classroom project – rapidly changing technology (including the apps) has really opened up the options 🙂

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human facial features the result of being used as a punching bag? somehow I don’t think so

I saw this story in the newspaper yesterday, & again today on one of the science feeds:  Researchers in the US have studied the skulls of ancient human ancestors and concluded that fist-fighting may have played a role in shaping the male face. You can read the paper itself here (Carrier & Morgan, 2014). I'm sorry, […]

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pharaoh’s serpent

Definitely don't try this one at home! The changes shown in the linked video are an example of intumescence, where a substance swells when it's heated. Fascinating to watch, but since we're talking mercury fumes it's definitely not one for the classroom.

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carl wieman on active learning

Recently I wrote about a paper by Freeman et al: a meta-analysis looking at the impact of active learning on student success in maths, engineering, & the sciences (the 'STEM' subjects). In the same volume of PNAS is an accompanying commentary by Carl Wieman. Wieman is a physics Nobel Laureate who also leads a research group working on […]

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“If you’re going to get lectured at, you might as well be at home in bunny slippers”

There's an increasing body of literature demonstrating the benefits of active learning for tertiary students taking science subjects. This is a topic I've written about before, but I'm always interested in reading more on the subject. And let's face it, the more evidence the better, when you're wanting to get lecturers in the sciences engaged […]

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