Science research works

I was pleased to read in February’s PhysicsWorld that a spin-off company started by Henning Sirringhaus and Richard Friend (the latter being one of my old university lecturers) has launched an exciting product into the electronics market – the Que. (Don’t ask me how to say it, nor why they have chose such awful colours for their […]

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Does my teaching work?

This year, I’ve finally decided (more accurately, finally got around to doing it) to undertake a Postgraduate Certificate in Tertiary Teaching.  In plain English, that means do some training that actually prepares me to teach at university. "What?" I hear you say – "You mean you haven’t got any qualification to teach at university?".  Nope. […]

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Wild weather in Waikato

Well, those of you living in the central North Island will probably have some idea already of what I’m going to say, but, for those of you who don’t, I’ll start by saying that the weather here has been rather predictable this week.  We’ve had three tropical-style days in a row, with a fourth shaping […]

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Say goodbye to the drill…

Here’s a nice piece of applied physics research that will excite a significant minority of the population – specifically those who dread going to the dentist. Personally, I have never had any issues with drills (needles are a different story), but I know lots of people who do. The proposed method uses cold plasmas to […]

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Can you feel the cold?

Writing the last piece about fridges has reminded me about a comment I heard from a fellow student while I was an undergraduate. I can’t remember the exact circumstances, but it quite possibly had something to do with objects in liquid nitrogen.  Anyway, the comment was something along the lines of ‘The temperature’s so low you […]

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The importance of physics

It is sometimes hard as a scientist to maintain a broad focus. It is very easy to get obsessed with your pet project and forget the equally important stuff being done by scientists and others elsewhere. Just because you find your research extremely interesting and you can see lots of uses for it, it doesn’t […]

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Simple Machines

There’s a lot to do while driving.   Look at the road – watch the speedo (98 kmh – OK there), watch the road – look in mirrors – check fuel gauge (half – OK there) – watch road – watch that car at the intersection ahead – check temperature gauge (where it should be) – […]

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